MINORITY HEALTH AND COLORECTAL CANCER

In light of the death of Chadwick Boseman, a black man most famously known for his role in Black Panther and other Marvel movies (may he rest in power), we must realize the racial disparities that occur in colon cancer. Colon cancer is the third-most common cancer in all adults in the USA. Colorectal cancer affects men and women and impacts people of all nationalities and ethnic groups. However, they are not impacted equally.

African Americans

  • 15 to 20% more likely to die from the disease than patients of any other race
  • higher chance of being diagnosed at a later stage and with a higher morality rate
  • recommended to be screened at 45 instead of 50 because of genetic factors (“African Americans with colorectal cancer are more likely to cope with an aggressive subtype fueled by a mutation in the KRAS gene, which drives cancer growth )
  • affected by socioeconomic barriers (low income, difficult to find transportation, lack of health insurance, lack of medical literacy, and access to care)

Asian Americans

  • 52% of Asian American adults between 50-75 have not been screening for colorectal cancer
  • colorectal cancer is the 2nd most common cancer in Asian Americans
  • risk of colorectal cancer increases greatly upon immigration to the United States
  • many Asian Americans are unfamiliar with colorectal cancer as disease rates in native countries are very low

Hispanics/Latinx

  • 47% of Hispanic adults between 50-75 have not been screening for colorectal cancer
  • also affected by socioeconomic barriers
  • cultural barriers (misconceptions about western medicine, language barrier in communicating with medical personnel)
  • talking about disease and death is culturally taboo

American Indians and Alaska Natives

  • fewer than half are current with colorectal cancer screening
  • colorectal cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer and second deadliest cancer in American Indians and Alaska Natives
  • they live in rural and isolated communities so it is hard to find screening
  • higher burden of cancer risk factors
  • socioeconomic barriers (lack of funding for tribal health clinics, high rates of poverty, lack of health insurance, etc. )

SYMPTOMS OF COLON CANCER

  • changes in bowel habits and stomach pain (diarrhea/constipation)
  • unexplained or unintentional weight loss
  • unexplained fatigue
  • anemia
  • cramping pain in the lower stomach
  • rectal bleeding with bright red blood
  • blood in the stool
  • cramps/abdominal pain

Symptoms of colon cancer mimic other GI disorders, so doctors are less likely to screen patients under 50 with these symptoms. If you have access to healthcare and you are experiencing any of these conditions, please see a doctor!

In honor of Chadwick Boseman, please consider donating to organizations like the Colon Cancer Coalition that raises awareness for early colon cancer detection and effective treatment for colon cancer patients.

sources:

https://www.inovanewsroom.org/featured-posts/2020/02/colon-cancer-and-the-black-community/

RACISM IS A PUBLIC HEALTH CRISIS

The coronavirus has impacted every one of us. COVID-19 does not discriminate between races as it affects everyone. However, it is affecting some races more than others. As of right now, the Navajo Nation has the highest per capita COVID-19 infection rate in the USA, surpassing New York which had been thought of as the epicenter of the pandemic. The Navajo Nation is the largest Native American tribe in the U.S. Its infection rate is 3.3% as the nation has a population of 173,667 people and has had 5,533 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 248 deaths. Its infection rate surpasses New York’s by roughly 1.0%.

American indigenous family aware of the dangers of the Covid19 pandemic stands 6 feet apart from one another

Coronavirus impacts minority groups differently than peoples in urban/major cities across America. These individuals are often of a lower income bracket and are frequently working in jobs that are deemed essential. Thus, they face a higher risk of infection than others. Also, Tyrone Whitehorse, a member of the DinĂ© Nation from Lechee, Arizona, wrote that “it’s hard to follow public health guidelines when the reservation is facing “systemic disparities,” like limited access to healthcare, minimal running water, and a lack of protective supplies. Nearly 1/3 of families on the reservation don’t have access to running water or electricity, let alone a clinic or a hospital nearby. In addition, on the Navajo reservation, there are only 13 grocery stores to serve an area the size of West Virginia. Therefore, when people were rushing to grocery stores across the nation, it caused members of the Navajo reservation to hit the dirt roads and drive an hour or more to the nearest grocery store. However, when they got there, much of the supplies they needed were gone already. Also, the small number of grocery stores result in food scarcity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stated that “current data suggests a disproportionate burden of illness and death among racial and ethnic minority groups.” Additionally, COVID-19 death rates for Black and Hispanic/Latino individuals “were substantially higher than that of white or Asian person” for cities across the country noted the CDC.

As you may know, when European settlers came to America, they brought diseases that left Native Americans ravaged and afraid of what can happen when there is no immunity in a population against foreign infections. With the rise of COVID-19, anxiety and fear threatened the people once again. Throughout the Navajo reservation, signs can be seen reading “Please stay away, we are trying to keep grandma safe” on homes. In Native American culture, stories and history are told orally, meaning that they typically don’t write out the stories, instead passing them down by speaking. The elders, who are knowledge keepers, culture bearers, storytellers, matriarchs, leaders, language teachers, are being disproportionally affected by the virus. When an elder dies, it is as if a library is burned down.

Please help the Navajo Nation by donating to any of the organizations listed below

To learn more, check out this action doc by Changing Womxn Collective: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1IG9uNbKF_xxdNWXB667YxBuRbnnRUDOnf6PcPGGECeI/edit

Originally published June 9

WHAT CAN WE DO TO HELP?

Image credit: lawyers weekly

DONATE

  1. GEORGE FLOYD MEMORIAL FUND
  2. MINNESOTA FREEDOM FUND
  3. RECLAIM THE BLOCK
  4. BLACK LIVES MATTER
  5. BAIL PROJECT
  6. BLACK VISIONS COLLECTIVE
  7. CAMPAIGN ZERO
  8. NATIONAL BAIL FUND NETWORK
  9. THE INNOCENT PROJECT
  10. RUN WITH MAUD
  11. JUSTICE FOR BREONNA
  12. ANTI POLICE-TERROR PROJECT
  13. COMMUNITY READY CORPS

If you don’t have money, watch this playlist of videos that I’ve curated that donates money to various organization. Make sure that your adblock is off as these videos use the money that it garners through Adsense and then the creator donates the money to organizations that help.

EDUCATE YOURSELF

READ:

  • BLACK FEMINIST THOUGHT – PATRICIA HILL COLLINS
  • ME AND WHITE SUPREMACY – LAYLA F. SAAD
  • HEAVY: AN AMERICAN MEMOIR – KIESE LAYMON
  • I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS – MAYA ANGELOU
  • WHITE FRAGILITY: WHY IT’S SO HARD FOR WHITE PEOPLE TO TALK ABOUT RACISM – ROBIN DIANGLO
  • BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME – TA-NEHISI COATES
  • BELOVED – TONI MORRISON

Also, if you click on this link, there are hundreds of free liberation documents from activists like Malcolm X, Marcus Garvey, and Toni Morrison.

PROTEST (peacefully and safely!)

Currently, the police are acting violently and arresting protesters. This includes using tear gas, shooting rubber bullets, driving vehicles through crowds, and macing children. Stay safe and be careful! Some supplies you should bring are: a backpack, water, face masks, hats/sunglasses, snacks, signs, change of clothing, walking shoes, cash (instead of credit cards). DO NOT WEAR CONTACTS! If tear gas gets into your eyes when you have contacts, you could be blinded. WRITE DOWN EMERGENCY NUMBERS ON YOUR ARM. Here is a link to a website that has a lot of information on how to protest safely: https://www.wired.com/story/how-to-protest-safely-gear-tips/

EMAIL/CALL YOUR REPRESENTATIVES AND DEMAND A CHANGE IN THE SYSTEM

SIGN PETITIONS

BECOME AN ALLY
HIRE, PROMOTE, AND SUPPORT BLACK PROFESSIONALS
RAISE AWARENESS BY POSTING ON SOCIAL MEDIA
RECOGNIZE YOUR PRIVILEGE

Additional ways you can help can be found at this link

Originally posted June 5