WHO IS MARCUS GARVEY?

Marcus Garvey - Beliefs, Books & Death - Biography
Marcus Garvey; 1887-1940

A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots

Marcus Garvey

Born in Saint Ann’s Bay, Jamaica, Marcus Garvey was a nationalist and leader of the Pan-Africanism movement which sought to unify and connect people of african descent worldwide. He founded the Negro World Newspaper, a shipping company called Black Star Line and the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) which was a fraternal organization of black nationalists. This group advocated around the world to establish independent black states, most notably in Liberia on the west coast of Africa, and “separate but equal” status for persons of African ancestry.

As an adolescent, Garvey was a victim of racism especially from his white teachers in Jamaica. In addition, he had left his hometown (St. Ann’s Bay) for Kingston, the island nation’s capital where he worked as an apprentice in a print shop. While working there, Garvey became involved in the labor union for print tradesmen in Kingston which many attribute as Garvey’s first step in activism. Marcus Garvey was both a racial purist and a Black separatist. He believed that all black people should return to their rightful homeland Africa. This message is very controversial, and prominent activists like W.E.B. Du Bois referred to him as “the most dangerous enemy of the Negro race in America and in the world.” Du Bois believed and hoped for a self-sustaining Black ecosystem within a predominantly white America.

To be honest, I do not know where I stand on Garvey and his ideals. On the one hand, I believe that there should be no distinction between cultures and one should intermingle with others. However, I do agree with some points in Garvey’s ideology where he denotes that he, as a black man, is the equal of any white man and that black is beautiful. If anyone has any thoughts on this, feel free to leave them in the comments!

LANGSTON HUGHES

Langston Hughes | Biography & Facts | Britannica
Langston Hughes; picture credits: Britannica

To my mind, it is the duty of the younger Negro artist, if he accepts any duties at all from outsiders, to change through the force of his art that old whispering ‘I want to be white,’ hidden in the aspirations of his people, to ‘Why should I want to be white? I am a Negro—and beautiful!’

Langston Hughes (1902-1967)

Brief Biography of Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes, born James Mercer Langston Hughes was born February 1, 1902, in Joplin Missouri. He is an American poet that is most known as the central figure in the Harlem Renaissance—an intellectual, artistic, and cultural explosion of African American that took place in Harlem, New York. Hughes sought to portray the joys and hardships of working-class black lives, avoiding the idealization and negative stereotypes that it typically connotes to.

There will never be a new world order unless women are a part of it.

Alice Paul

Alice Paul | National Women's History Museum
Alice Paul: women’s rights activist, suffragist, feminist

Today, August 18th, marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment. The 19th amendment represents the fight and protests that suffragettes put up against men in order for their voice to be heard. It represents almost a century long struggle. The 19th amendment guarantees women the right to vote.

Edit August 20:

It was recently brought to my attention that this amendment wasn’t inclusive for all women. The 19th amendment marks the United States’ allowance for white women to vote. Up until 1924, Native Americans weren’t considered citizens of the United States. Along with that, they also didn’t have voting rights until 1924. Also, it wasn’t until 1965 that Black people got the right to vote under the Voting Rights Act signed by former President Lyndon B. Johnson. I apologize for not knowing all of the details before I posted this. As a blog, I aim to inform myself, so I am able to inform all of you guys. I have attached a link to a pdf that has a useful timeline of voting in America. If it can’t pop up for any reason, I have included the URL here.

55 years ago today {March 7}, we were beaten, tear gassed, and trampled by horses. I thought I saw death. I thought I was going to die. I don’t know how I made it back, but I know we cannot rest. We cannot become weary. We must keep pushing and pulling and find a way to get in the way.

Representative John Lewis (Feb. 21, 1940 – July 17, 2020).
Obituary: John Lewis, US civil rights champion - BBC News
Representative John Lewis. Rest in Power.

Originally published July 17